Local Catch Up On Prime


Help Is On The Way

Help Is On The Way is the story of the Kiwi ingenuity and bravery that resulted in 36 people being rescued from the upper floors of the 26-storey Hotel Grand Chancellor.

Catch Up Now


How We Eat With Simon Gault

Kiwi chef Simon Gault is on an expedition to find out how we eat and what it does for our health. Journeying to the Greek Islands and Turkey, Simon investigates the benefits of the Mediterranean diet.

Catch Up Now


The Changing Face of the NZ Dairy

Dashing down to the local dairy has long been a Kiwi institution. This documentary examines the evolution of the dairy and the impact it has had on migrants looking to find their place in New Zealand. 

Catch Up Now


Making New Zealand S3

For the early settlers and those who followed this wild and isolated country, Aotearoa was a world away from anything they knew. Yet somehow they laid the foundations for the nation we live in today.

Catch Up Now


Living With Tourette's S2

Tourette’s Syndrome is an incurable disorder causing uncontrollable verbal outbursts and physical tics. These can make it impossible for sufferers to work, make friends, or even go to the shops.

Catch Up Now


Beneath NZ

New Zealand owes its existence to a fiery past. Volcanoes lifted islands out of the sea and generated rivers from their slopes. But the past isn’t dead.

Catch Up Now


Anthems

Anthems: New Zealand’s Iconic Hits tells the stories of many of New Zealand’s iconic songs.

Catch Up Now


Demolition NZ

Get your hard hats ready! Following the success of the one-off documentary The Demolition Teams, Prime presents a new series of Demolition NZ.

Catch Up Now


Renee's Brain

RENEE’S BRAIN is an inspiring documentary that follows New Zealand’s most severe sufferer of Tourette Syndrome, 25-year-old Renee Harvey, as she embarks on a surgical journey that could save her life, yet may also take her life. 

Catch Up Now


Living With Tourette's

Tourette’s Syndrome is an incurable disorder causing uncontrollable verbal outbursts and physical tics. These can make it impossible for sufferers to work, make friends, or even go to the shops.

Catch Up Now